Immersive Performance

Axis-to-one

Talsoom

Talsoom

“Talsoom” is an immersive VR piece that features the process of observing and learning the traditional and extraordinary movements of Talchum from the perspective of cultural transmitters in reality.
The spaces in this piece, which were created through 3D scans, exist both in reality and in the virtual world.
“Axis-to-one” wants to draw attention to the changes in sensation that take place throughout this journey through an experience in which a realistic space disperses, comes back together, moves into a virtual space, and then encounters the memories of the transmitter’s body in that virtual space.
How can body memories being transmitted and the sense of separation in a virtual space intersect? What can we sense in this process? “Talsoom” starts with these questions and explores how we should look at the memories of today’s bodies.

Axis-to-one

The name “Axis-to-one” encompasses two meanings: everyone maintains their own axis while “making one axis.” Our team name was inspired by the X, Y, and Z axes in virtual space as well as Rudolf von Laban’s theory of Space Harmony.
“Talsoom” is an immersive VR piece that features the process of observing and learning the traditional and extraordinary movements of Talchum from the perspective of cultural transmitters in reality. The spaces in this piece, which were created through 3D scans, exist both in reality and in the virtual world.
Axis-to-one wants to draw attention to the changes in sensation that take place throughout this journey through an experience in which a realistic space disperses, comes back together, moves into a virtual space, and then encounters the memories of the transmitter’s body in that virtual space.
Team consists of students from the K-Arts majoring in filmmaking, fine arts, and stage design.

Youkyong Song studied Fine Arts at the School of Visual Arts and has been working on performance, visual, and interdisciplinary arts. In the Talsum project, she is interested in finding differences between movements input in real and virtual space and seeks to explore sensory variations in media changing by conversion.

Minjung Park, from the Department of Filmmaking at the School of Film, TV, & Multimedia, has mainly been working on performance art, videos, and games. She is fond of the moments when a very private story expands into a common story.

Chaelin Lee majored in Fine Arts at the School of Visual Arts and has been working on flat works and installation art. She is concerned about the audience’s experience in the Talsum project and how to apply it if t any chance of intervention in the narrative to be made arises.

Jungsoo Lee graduated from the Department of Stage Design at the School of Drama and explores various audience experiences in the non-place and on-material age through theatrical art. Having significantly worked on the subject of dual existence between virtual and real stages, she suggests using the interactive, telepresence networks of games by digitally converting the body parts of performers and audiences.

Team interview